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windows7

If you're unsure whether your current system can run Windows 7, download and run Microsoft's Upgrade Advisor to assess your hardware's capabilities. When I ran it on an aging XP laptop, it told me I needed to back up my files and perform a Custom installation (see below), that my hard disk didn't have enough free space (you need 16GB), and that the laptop wouldn't run Aero Desktop. The good news, however, was that my 1.6-GHz CPU and 1.5GB RAM were sufficient. The advisor actually checks a lot more than the basic system requirements, and it lists every piece of hardware and software you have installed at the bottom of its report.

If you want to run Windows 7 on your PC, here's what it takes:

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1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor

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1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit)

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16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)

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DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver

Additional requirements to use certain features:

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Internet access (fees may apply)

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Depending on resolution, video playback may require additional memory and advanced graphics hardware

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For some Windows Media Center functionality a TV tuner and additional hardware may be required

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Windows Touch and Tablet PCs require specific hardware

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HomeGroup requires a network and PCs running Windows 7

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DVD/CD authoring requires a compatible optical drive

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BitLocker requires Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 1.2

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BitLocker To Go requires a USB flash drive

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Windows XP Mode requires an additional 1 GB of RAM, an additional 15 GB of available hard disk space, and a processor capable of hardware virtualization with Intel VT or AMD-V turned on

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Music and sound require audio output

Product functionality and graphics may vary based on your system configuration

 

Choose an Edition

There are lots of different editions of Windows 7, but only three you can buy: Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate. For most people, Home Premium will make the most sense. If your company decides to upgrade, Professional supports domain joining, network backup, and XP emulation. Ultimate includes everything in both other versions, and adds BitLocker encryption.

The key thing to consider here is that you have to do a clean installation—without the ability to carry your apps along—if you move from one level of Vista to another level of Windows 7, say from Vista Home Premium to Windows 7 Professional. The exception is Windows 7 Ultimate, which will let you perform an in-place upgrade from any level of Vista—as long as you don't change whether you're using the 32- or 64-bit version.

Don't forget to look into special pricing offers, such as those for students and family packs. And if you're installing on a machine you've freshly built, you can pay less for OEM versions that don't include all the packaging and support. The Student upgrade license is just $29.99, and PC part suppliers offer the OEM versions at steep discounts as well.

Choose 64-bit or 32-bit

Any computer manufactured in the last few years will probably have a 64-bit capable CPU. The rule of thumb is that if you have, or intend to install, more than 3GB of memory on your PC, you want 64-bit Windows.

And don't worry about your old 32-bit programs—compatibility features inside Windows allow most of these to run in the 64-bit OS, the exceptions generally being antivirus software and hardware drivers. One significant holdback, however, is Adobe's Flash: If you run the 64-bit version of Internet Explorer that comes with Windows 7, you won't be able to view Web sites that use Flash. But there's an easy fix: Run 32-bit IE for those sites until Adobe gets with the program.

Both 32- and 64-bit installation discs come in the Windows 7 box, so you only have to specify which you want if you're downloading the code. In short, my recommendation is that if your system can run 64-bit software, go for it: You'll be using your CPU and memory more efficiently, and you'll be future-proofed for upcoming 64-bit apps. —next: Back Up Your Data >

First, you state that "The key thing to consider here is that you have to do a clean installation—without the ability to carry your apps along—if you move from one level of Vista to another level of Windows 7, say from Vista Home Premium to Windows 7 Professional." Not entirely true. I have two Vista laptops - a 64 bit Vista Home Basic and 64 bit Vista Home Premium. I will be updating the 64 bit Windows 7 Home Premium on both. The Windows 7 chart, which you can find on the Windows Upgrade page, clearly shows that since I'm going 64 to 64 on the Vista Home Basic, I can do a straight install. I would only be if I went from 32 to 64 where I would have to do it clean.
And to "renadev" who asked, "only two months before i purchased my acer aspire lap top..it is running with wista..now i like to upgrade it to windows7...without charge how i will get w7"

Turn on your computer so that Windows starts normally. (To perform an upgrade, you can't start, or "boot," your computer from the Windows 7 upgrade disc or downloaded Windows 7 installation file.)

  • After Windows has started, do one of the following:
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    If you purchased and downloaded Windows 7 online, browse to the installation file you downloaded, and then double-click it.

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    If you have a Windows 7 installation disc, insert the disc into your computer. Setup should start automatically. If it doesn't, click the Start button, click Computer, double-click your DVD drive to open the Windows 7 installation disc, and then double-click setup.exe.

  • On the Install Windows page, click Install now.

  • On the Get important updates for installation page, we recommend getting the latest updates to help ensure a successful installation and to help protect your computer against security threats. You need an Internet connection to get installation updates.

  • On the Please read the license terms page, if you accept the license terms, click I accept the license terms.

  • On the Which type of installation do you want? page, click Upgrade to begin the upgrade. You might see a compatibility report.

     

    Picture of the Which type of installation do you want? pageThe Which type of installation do you want? page

     

  • Follow the instructions to finish installing Windows 7.

  • When you choose Custom, you install a new copy of Windows on the partition you select. This erases your programs and settings. Back up any files and settings you want to keep so that you can restore them after the installation. You must manually reinstall your programs when the installation is done.

    In some countries or regions, if you purchase and download Windows 7 online from the Microsoft Store, you can download a tool from Microsoft that transfers the Windows installation file to a USB flash drive and makes the flash drive bootable. For more information about the options available in your country or region, go online to the Microsoft Store.

    1. Turn on your computer so that Windows starts normally, then do one of the following:
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      If you purchased and downloaded Windows 7 online, browse to the installation file you downloaded, and then double-click it.

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      If you have a Windows 7 installation disc, insert the disc into your computer. Setup should start automatically. If it doesn't, click the Start button, click Computer, double-click your DVD drive to open the Windows 7 installation disc, and then double-click setup.exe.

    1. On the Install Windows page, follow any instructions that are displayed, and then click Install now.

    2. On the Get important updates for installation page, we recommend getting the latest updates to help ensure a successful installation and to help protect your computer against security threats. You need an Internet connection to get installation updates.

    3. On the Please read the license terms page, if you accept the license terms, click I accept the license terms.

    4. On the Which type of installation do you want? page, click Custom.

    5. On the Where do you want to install Windows? page, do one of the following:
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      If you don't want to specify a specific partition to install Windows on, or create partitions on your hard disk, click Next to begin the installation.

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      If you already have another existing partition with enough free space and want to have more than one operating system on the same computer, you can install Windows on that partition. This is called a dual-boot or multiboot configuration. (If you do this, be sure to install Windows on a different partition from the partition where your current version of Windows is installed.) Select the partition you want to use, and then click Next to begin the installation.

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      If you want to create, extend, delete, or format a partition, click Drive options (advanced), click the option you want, and then follow the instructions. Click Next to begin the installation. (If the Drive options (advanced) option is disabled, you need to start your computer using the installation disc or USB flash drive if you downloaded and purchased Windows 7 online.)

    6. Follow the instructions to finish installing Windows 7.

     
    Warning

    Warning

    If you delete or format a partition that contains a version of Windows, all data on the partition is permanently deleted. However, if there is an existing copy of Windows on the partition you selected, but you do not format or delete the partition, user files are saved to a Windows.old folder on the partition. However, you should still back up your user files before performing a custom installation. For example, if you have encrypted files, you might not be able to access them after installing Windows. If you’ve backed up your user files and then restored them after installing Windows, you can delete the Windows.old folder.

     

     

     

     

    Win-advance-Server or Windows Vista

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    Last modified: July 07, 2011